ONE NIGHT IN NEW DELHI

ISBN: 9781370271825
ASIN: B01M09X76D
Publisher: Tirgearr Publishing
CLICK HERE TO BUY
City Nights Series, #27
Cover artist: Cora Graphics
Models: Vikkas Bhardwaj (FB) and Dima Mawas

Hannah Maguire and Sudesh Kumar had been lovers in Dublin City, both studying for their degrees in similar areas of Archaeology. What she had treated as a college romance, Hannah realized, as he was leaving Dublin for the job of a lifetime back home in India, was she had lost her heart to him.

Now, five years later, Hannah is working as an archivist in the National Museum in Dublin when she's invited to the National Museum of India in New Delhi to inspect a new and rare artefact found on an archaeological dig.

The last person she expects to see when she enters the museum is Sudesh. She didn’t know where he was, or even if he was still in India, but soon learns he's the one who made the discovery, and had been the one encouraging the museum to invite her onto the project.

On meeting, everything they'd shared washes over Hannah—all of the love and passion, and a heart so broken, she still hadn't recovered. To make things more difficult, it's Deepavali/Diwali and Sudesh has promises to make it a memorable experience.

Will this one night really be one to remember, or will Sudesh's secret send Hannah into a tailspin she might not recover from this time?

New Delhi, India

“Hannah?”

Startled, I spun at the sound of my name and stumbled into the newcomer’s arms, my feet slipping out from under me, and the dupatta falling off my head.

Shock rushed through me. As much as I hadn’t expected to see Sudesh while I was in New Delhi, it hadn’t really occurred to me that if I did, it would be in the museum. It was an illogical thought. He was as much an archaeologist as I was, so why wouldn’t he be here?

My flesh came alive as I slid against him, his familiar scent washing over me in a tidal wave. My heart pounded in my throat, cutting off my air. I was sure I looked as startled as he did.

The weight of my body in his arms compounded our closeness, as he stumbled to keep us both from falling to the floor. A few inches more, and I’d be supine with him on top of me. The thought made that place between my thighs thrum to life.

I’d always loved the way he pronounced my name. His soft accent made the old-fashioned name I never liked sound sensual and beautiful. Even now, after so long, that one simple word was like a punch in the gut that brought up all the feelings I thought I’d cried out of me.

“Sudesh.”

Even to me, his name sounded like a caress on my lips. I clung to him, praying he’d opt for the floor, even as he pulled me up to stand before him.
“Namaste,” he greeted me.

He didn’t release me but embraced me tenderly. He cupped my cheek in one hand and kissed me. I felt his fingers at my nape as his palm seared its imprint on my face. I gasped against his mouth.

His kiss was too short to be passionate, too long to be casual, but just long enough to muddle my thoughts. I tasted Masala tea on his lips, and this morning’s dream flashed before me. The short stubble around his mouth heightened the electricity building inside me.

I fisted the fabric across his back and sensed muscle mass beneath that I didn’t remember from our time together in Dublin. I knew every inch of his body—or I had, anyway. His time working dig sites had obviously filled him out, and I was curious to see him as he was now.

I didn’t push him away—I couldn’t—but I had to fight my instincts to pull him closer. He’d left me heartbroken, but damn it, I suddenly didn’t care.

It was Sudesh who finally ended the kiss, though he didn’t take his arms from around me.

His dark eyes, framed with black lashes, darted over me as if searching for something. I couldn’t look away.

His black hair was a little shaggier than I remembered. It fell around his face as if he’d only finger-combed it.

The stubble around his mouth was also new. The short whiskers surrounding his perfectly-shaped, full lips told me he hadn’t just missed a couple days’ shaving, but was now his style.

At college, Sudesh had presented himself as a clean-shaven young man with a short haircut. On the outside, he’d been very businesslike. He wasn’t my type, so I’d only reluctantly agreed to go out with him. But I quickly realized never to judge someone by their looks. It was in the bedroom that his inner tiger emerged. Now, that tiger was very much in evidence. And I liked it.



REVIEWS

So wonderful I am reading it again-- One Night in New Delhi is amazing
One Night in New Delhi is an emotional, erotic love story . . . I was there with Hannah, enjoying her reunion with Sudesh and the beautiful city of New Delhi. ~ Kathleen Rowland, Amazon





NAME
PRONUNCIATION
MEANING
Babuji
bah-BOO-gee
Father—nickname, like daddy or papa vs father
Mataji
MAH-TAH-gee
Mother
Pitaji
PIT-AH-gee
Father
Rajkumar
raj-KOO-mar
Son of a king/nobleman . . . prince


Sudesh Kumar
soo-DAYsh Koo-MAR
Also SOO-desh
or in old Sanskrit–SWED-esh




Lakshmi, also Laxmi
LAHKS-mee
Goddess of prosperity and fortune (one of the Trinity Goddesses)
Parvati
PAR-vaht-ee
Goddess of love and fertility (one of the Trinity Goddesses)
Saraswati
SER-UH-swat-ee
Goddess of the arts and knowledge (one of the Trinity Goddesses)






CLOTHING
PRONUNCIATION
MEANING
Choli
CHO-lee
Short cropped blouse, part of the saree outfit
Dupatta
doo-PAH-tuh
Scarf made from silk or cotton
Jutti
JOO-tee
A type of slipper/soft shoe
Khussa
KUSS-uh
Men’s jutti slippers
Kurta
KOOR-tuh
A long shirt
Lehnga
LENG-uh
Wedding saree
Lungi
Lun-gee
Similar to a sarong, a single piece of fabric wrapped around the hips.
Pheta
Feh-tuh
Turban-style headdress
Pyjama
puh-JAH-muh
Stemmed from the Persian word pāyjāmeh which means leg-garment. Matching trousers worn with the kurta.
Pashmina
pash-MEE-nuh
Scarf made from fine wool
Saree, also Sari
SAH-ree
Woman’s clothing






FOOD
PRONUNCIATION
MAIN INGREDIENTS
Bhaji
BAH-gee
Fried onion patties
Burfi
BER-fee
Milk-based cake
Galub Jamun
GAH-lub jam-OON
Fried milk dough soaked in sugar water with cardamom and rosewater (like American donut holes in syrup)
Lassi
LASS-ee
Liquid yogurt drink
Naan
Nahn
Flat bread
Pakora
PAH-kor-uh
Batter fried vegetables
Saag paneer
SAG pan-EER
Saag—wilted greens (usually mustard or spinach) with spices
Paneer—Indian cheese
Samosa
sam-OH-suh
Filled pastry, fried






MISC
PRONUNCIATION
MEANING
Akshardham
Uk-SHER-dum
A temple completed in 2010
Alamkara
ahl-im-KAH-ruh
The practice of beautifying the body with adornments—colorful clothing, jewelry, mehndi, etc.
Bahut dhanyavaad
Bah-HOOT thun-yuh-vod
Thank you very much
Bindi
BIN-dee
A red dot between the eyebrows at the sixth chakra
Deepavali
dee-PAV-lee
Festival of Lights (traditional spelling)
Diwali
deh-VALL-ee
Festival of Lights (Anglicized spelling)
Diya
DEE-yah
Small pottery oil lamp
Haveli
huh-VEH-lee
Mansion house, open to guests, similar to a B&B
Kulhad
koo-LAWD
Pottery cup for lassi, tea, and other hot beverages and foods
Mehndi
MEN-dee
Temporary intricate design created with henna dye, aka henna tattoo
Namaskar
nam-uh-skar
The act of greeting—with the palms held together as if praying.
This means the speaker recognizes the holy spirit in the other person. It is respectful to return the greeting in the same manner.
Namaste
nah-mes-tay
Greeting while performing namaskar—“hello”
Priya
PREE-yuh
Beloved, my love, dear . . . also a female name
Puja
POO-juh
Ritual or ceremony
Sone ki Chidia
sown KEE chid-ya
The Golden Bird, India’s nickname



Main tumase pyaar karata hoon. Main tumhen bahut pyaar karata hoon, priya , mere dil mein dard hai jab ham alag kar rahe hain. Aur main aap ko chot pahunchaane ke lie bahut khed hai.

(Hindi)
I love you. I love you so much, my beloved, my heart aches when we are apart. And I am so sorry for hurting you.



Ba é mo locht. Bhí eagla orm. Ní raibh sé cothrom a thabhairt duit, agus Tá brón orm tú a hurting fad an am.

(Irish)
It was my fault. I was afraid. It wasn’t fair to you, and I’m sorry you’ve been hurting all this time.



Kahate hain ki tum mere saath rahana hoga, priya.

(Hindi)
Say you will stay with me, beloved.



Bhfuil tú mo chroí agus m'anam, agus má tá mé le maireachtáil, ní mór dom a bheith chomh maith in éineacht leat.

(Irish)
You possess my heart and soul, and if I am to survive, I must also be with you.